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God Gave C2H6O Part 1: Introductory Comments


This is a topic that I have never intended to write on, primarily because of the inevitable knee-jerk reactions it will provoke. Those reactions will be along the lines of, Yeah, right. Here’s another libertine trying to justify his sin, another carnal Christian (a fictitious character, by the way) indulging his flesh in the name of Christian liberty. In a post on another blog, and in the subsequent comments (the provocation for this post), the observation was made that the only people who seem to care about this issue are precisely that kind of person. That observation, which in my experience has been accurate, was intended to demonstrate that only the unsanctified and self-centered would defend such an indefensible practice, but the spiritually mature know better. I believe the commenters who questioned the motives of those who defend this practice were sincere, but very often that charge is little more than a way of disqualifying their opponents by attacking their character—Clearly, if you were more holy, you would see it my way—so, because of the very predictable ad hominem, very few are even willing to take on the argument. Hence me, here, now.

The topic, in case you have forgotten your chemistry (like me—I had to look it up) is beverage alcohol use. The purpose of this post is not to defend myself, but the sufficiency of Scripture and the character of God. That may seem grandiose, but I believe the stakes are that high. You will see why as this topic unfolds. The purpose of this post is not to persuade anyone to drink wine who doesn’t want to. Also, I do not believe I am under any obligation to prove anything. I am not trying to bind anyone’s conscience, and I believe Scripture is plain enough to place the burden of proof on the prohibitionists, not me.

Although it should go without saying, this is not a defense of drunkenness. It’s a shame that I have to say so, but there are those who refuse to separate drunkenness from the enjoyment of a gift from God. They will probably continue to do so in spite of this disclaimer, but there it is.

Another reason I have not formally addressed this issue is the fact that many men whom I deeply respect disagree with me. In fact, the one Bible teacher who has had the greatest influence on my theology, of whom I can say with no exaggeration, I am who I am because of his ministry, will disagree with me on this. His view on this subject seem an anomaly in the midst of a stellar life of biblical exposition. I can only assume, with all due respect, that it is the baggage of a fundamentalist background.

Some of the issues I will address, not necessarily in order, are:

I absolutely will not be addressing the “wine back then was Welch’s” argument. With all due respect to some pretty smart guys who say so, I just don’t think it’s a viable theory worthy of consideration.

I really have nothing to say about this that has not already been said. Additionally, much of my understanding of this issue comes from God Gave Wine by Kenneth L. Gentry. If readers of that book suspect me of plagiarism, I confess right up front, but it’s not intentional.

Finally, some may ask, Why address this at all? If it is such a contentious, divisive issue, why not just give it up? Why not just abstain for the sake of peace and unity? Because peace and unity cannot be had at the expense of truth. The truth cannot be sold, especially so cheaply.

This issue is being discussed currently because the Southern Baptist Convention has written a resolution condemning alcohol use. Consequently, the question has been asked, How Does It Feel To Exclude Jesus From Your Denomination?

Tune in next time for Sola Scriptura and the SBC.

Suggested homework:

Next: Part 2: Sola Scriptura and the SBC



Posted 2006·07·17 by David Kjos
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Will You Be Having Some Wine? from Fundamentally Reformed » About six years ago I took my future wife out on our first OCD (off campus date). We were at Olive Garden and at our own table (which was a big deal back then ) and this suave waiter walks on up and presents us with a bottle of wine. He asks, “W... [Read More] » Tracked on 2006·07·31



10 Comments:


#1 || 06·07·16··22:41 || David

I probably will not answer every comment to these posts. I will, however, try to answer questions and objections in subsequent posts. I might even follow up with a post answering questions that don't fit into the main posts. So, fire away--I'm not ignoring you. That's assuming anyone is reading this.


#2 || 06·07·16··22:57 || Doug

Wine is regarded as a blessing from God in scripture, and like all blessings we have a knack for abusing it and trying to abolish it. It is not the blessing that causes this discussion but our own lack of self control. Honestly, this sort of thing is a main reason I don't define my theology as reformed baptist.

Pass me a cold one, will ya?


#3 || 06·07·17··18:43 || Jonathan Moorhead

David, you already know my view on this. So many things are good in and of themselves until they are abused: food, sex, alcohol, etc. I'm glad my conscience allows me to drink (not as a DTS student of course) so I can glorify God for one more thing.


#4 || 06·07·17··18:56 || David

Jonathan, you give me two reasons to glorify God: first, you're right about this issue, and second, you respect authority, even when it's wrong. The second is as important as the first.

Doug, you stop over and I'll serve it up!


#5 || 06·07·19··07:59 || Dutch

Looking forward to seeing your points of view unfold on this topic. Question: Will you be grading the homework???


#6 || 06·07·19··09:15 || Daniel

Bah! you're a winebibber and a glutton David!

lol.

I told you once, abstinance is easier - when you abstain you don't have to defend yourself against the legalists in your church.


#7 || 06·07·19··12:46 || Jim

David, I am looking forward to this series.

I seriously laugh at the thought of anyone trying to give glory to God by drinking however. That is just too sanctimonious.

Now, if you would say that you like to drink alcohol, and you see no proof in scripture forbidding it, then at least you're being honest.

God bless,
Jim


#8 || 06·07·19··20:54 || Brian Thornton

I am one who goes against the knee-jerkers who say those who try to defend the action are just trying to justify drinking for themselves because they drink.

I do not drink, never have, and probably never will (unless my church begins using real wine for the Lord's Supper...then I most certainly will partake!).

I posted an article on this at my site dated July 3rd, talking about how, apparently, Paul, Timothy, Jesus and others were not qualified for leadership according to many of the declarations being made today (SBC is a prime example).


#9 || 06·07·21··14:52 || Jonathan Moorhead

Jim, I seriously feel sorry for anyone who doesn't glorify God for all he has given us. Would you laugh at "anyone trying" to give glory to God for sex?


#10 || 06·07·22··14:28 || Dale "Lutheran Confessions" Nelson

One area where this teetotalism can have a regrettable bearing is with regard to employment in church-sponsored educational institutions.

I'm an associate professor of English in a state university. I've been interested, from time to time, in the possibility of teaching in a Christian college.

But such places often require adherence to policies and statements of faith that I can't buy:

1. dubious eschatological affirmations

2. teetotalism

No, I don't have to drink wine, etc. But in the face of Isaiah 25 (for example), I can't abide such lawmaking.

Of course, if I taught in a Missouri Synod college I wouldn't have these problems. But they don't seem t have a great need for new English teachers!


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